Tag Archives: poppies

Sowing the Poppies

28 September 2019

I’ve written earlier about how tricky it can be to grow wild flowers, and how we’ve been warned that poppies prefer to grow in newly-disturbed soil – we knew about the ‘disturbed’ bit, but just how often can we produce the ‘newly-disturbed’ area they like? Anyway, we had another go this year, and in line with not digging or forking the soil over (because it destroys the soil structure), we just hoed it after lifting this year’s dead poppies.

Then a couple of weeks ago, the children from the local preschool (Mentmore Road Under-Fives) came round to help us. They raked the soil level again and added leaf mould liberally, then sowed pinches of poppy seed saved from this year’s crop. Then the seed had to be in good contact with the soil – in some situations, this is done by animals trampling the seed in, so the children duly became very obedient cows, and stomped all over the area they’d sown. They thoroughly enjoyed being not only allowed to step on the bare earth, but positively encouraged to do so!

Here they are helping us get the poppies well into the earth

And ten days later, their seeds germinated; there are hundreds of tiny seedlings that you can just see if you know where to look. When the children came round again this week to lift the carrots they’ve been growing, they were able to see how well they’d sown them. And we know we’ll have poppies again in June, as usual.

Growing wild flowers – 2

10 July 2019

As I mentioned in the last post, we’re experimenting with growing a few perennial UK native plants, to take over from the poppies and cornflowers as they fade.

At the moment, the small scabious and knapweed are taking over at the same height as the poppies and cornflowers

Small scabious in another bed

Knapweed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

while nearer the ground we have geranium sanguineum  and yarrow keeping the show going:

Geranium sanguineum (small pink flower) and yarrow (taller white one)

In a previous post I mentioned that poppies in particular grow best in newly-disturbed soil, which is why we’ve emptied that end bed in the autumn in previous years and forked it over. However, there have been a number of really great displays of poppies just growing in grass this year, as on Soulbury Road grassy bank, so we’re going to try something different this year – we’ll add a few more clumps of perennial wild flowers through more of that end bed, hoe between them to disturb the soil a little, and sow the poppy and cornflower seeds there. That should distribute the flowers more evenly while still keeping the display going through the whole bed.

Meadow cranesbill

We also have a couple of meadow cranesbill plants at the Bowls Club end of that bed, and some tall wild carrots, some of whose flower heads are just beginning their characteristic turning inside out, to form urn-shaped seed heads that will last well into winter.

But we will still keep a poppies-only strip at the front – we have to have poppies here in front of the war memorial, and where better than a great display just as you come in from the car park?

The poppies

31 May 2018

We keep tweaking the wild flower bed.

When the new beds were dug in the Memorial Gardens over the winter of 2013-4, there were many different plans for them, but the one thing everyone agreed on was that the bed nearest the car park should have a great display of poppies. This was broadened to include the standard cornfield annuals mixture to make the display last longer, with a band of poppies first, then cornflowers, then oxeye daisies. This was spectacular that first year, and the poppies were allowed to seed and regrow the second year, when they made a great display again. The stalks and seedheads were left as food for birds and insects, and for insects to hibernate in, which led to a few complaints that the gardens looked messy and disrespectful of its setting, particularly for the services on Remembrance Sunday.

So we began to manage the gardens in a slightly different way, but always kept that first bed for the poppy display, letting some of the seed fall on the ground, and resowing in the autumn and spring (because we don’t quite trust ourselves, and there’s only one chance to get it right for the display every year). A couple of regular passers-by congratulated us this week for managing to get the poppies flowering four years running – apparently it’s notoriously difficult to get them to come back year after year. They don’t just like disturbed ground, they like newly-disturbed ground (the best displays are round the edges of road-building sites). And of course, poppies became a symbol of remembrance after the first world war, as they covered the ground that had been battlefields in northern France and Belgium.

We also followed the usual advice for bee-friendly native plants, and sowed other cornfield annuals, mainly cornflowers and oxeye daisies. Usually they’ve all done well, especially the oxeyes which do tend to take over, as a trip along the M25 to Heathrow reminded me this week – white daisies everywhere, but nothing else left from the wild flowers they sowed. This year, the cornflowers suffered with the cold wet winter, and the few tiny plants that did make it through were mostly finished off by the cold snap in April. We’ve been experimenting with more perennial wild flowers in the other half of the bed, but that’s for another post.

We’re very aware that June’s great display of poppies could easily become November’s ‘weed bed’, as one disgruntled local business-owner put it. So the cultivation the poppies need also helps to keep the place tidy as we not only cut down the stalks and seedheads, but remove the plants completely, resow, and fork the soil over  One of the many compromises of wild flower gardening is that clearing the plants away every year means that we destroy the understory of stonecrop, black meddick and forget-me-nots that arrives with the poppies in the spring. It’s a bit untidy, but we generally leave it that way as long as the poppies themselves seem to be thriving, as we’ve noticed that those lower-growing plants are just alive with insects: the bed as a whole seems to be a mini-ecosystem. So far it’s worked – here’s this year’s display, just starting. Something to enjoy for the next month! And then the cycle starts all over again with seed-saving, clearing the plants away, forking the ground over, and resowing for next year.